Saturday, December 8, 2012

SEPIA SATURDAY (141)

On Sepia Saturday this week, 
Alan's prompt picture takes us to the city, 
my own comfort zone, 
to see some landmarks. 
Montreal still has quite a few old ones, 
thankfully!!


GUARANTEED PURE MILK Co
A young lad named George Hogg
born on a farm in Montreal, 
started early on producing milk in 1883 
and by 1885, 
he started distribution as well, 
establishing  good business despite his young age. 
By 1900, 
he took over with an associate 
a business that was failing from its beginning 
to give it a fresh start. 
This was to be the province's first dairy plant. 
Acquisitions, expansion and relocation were needed over time.



It does look quaint to see these now. 
I remember [from my own youth
the milkman and his truck 'till the early 1970s, 
bringing to our door those milk [glass] bottles every morning, 
which eventually became carton bottles and milk bags... 
You had to put a sign in your window to let him know 
when you wanted something, or not... 
Those were the days!!




Pasteurization in the 1930s. 
Dairy products had come a long way in the evaluation of their quality. 
The trust of consumers had to be earned.


The company had its headquarters on Lucien L'allier Street built in 1930 
and opened in 1932, 
with other divisions throughout the city to ensure proper distribution to its customers.


At the same time, 
the water tower was erected on the roof 
and shaped as a milk bottle bearing the name of the company, 
well visible all around back then. 
It stood 32 ft high and 12 ft in diameter, 
weighting 6 tons with a capacity of 250 000 Litre of water. 
Nowadays, 
it is dwarfed by the many office towers surrounding it, 
a vestige of the Art Deco era. 
Between fusion and takeovers, 
the company itself eventually closed in 1990, 
but the bottle remains.


It turned into a derelict state and was often threatened with complete removal, 
but concerned citizens and organizations managed to ensure its survival 
as an heritage piece of the city's history 
and it was finally restored in 2009.



It now shines bright, 
even if the building underneath could use some restoration itself...


So, 
this was my little tidbit about one of Montreal's landmarks. 
I'll now direct you toward 
SEPIA SATURDAY 
so you can find out more gems like this from around the world. 
Thanks for dropping by!!


Do you [still] drink milk? 
I know I did drink [a lot of] it when I was a kid 
but turns out I'm lactose intolerant 
and must avoid the stuff now. 
I now drink soy milk, 
which I find delicious, 
thankfully!! 
Guaranteed Pure Milk was associated with the "Group Milk" in the mid-1980s 
to promote dairy products. 
Even if the company is no longer, 
the group still exists to this day.


Who doesn't remember these ad campaigns 
where celebrities would appear with a milk mustache!?! 
This one is from 1999. 
YUM!!


Here, 
we put toques on bus shelters, 
as seen in 2010, 
to promote this as a comfort food. 
Yeah, 
I guess, 
if you turn it into a hot cocoa... 
:D~ 
That's it for this week!! 
See you all again soon, 
for another look at my hometown, 
Montreal!! 
:)~ 
HUGZ

33 comments:

  1. A set of perfect images for the theme. You are right to focus on the advertisement in the theme picture rather than the overalls - it was the advertisement that first jumped out at me when I saw it. As for milk delivery men, we still have one comes down our street although I must confess I buy the milk from the supermarket.

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    1. You do??? Wow!! I thought this was really a thing of the past...

      We still have some of those painted ads on buildings here and there,
      slowly fading/peeling away. I had another vintage pic,
      but I hadn't done any research [yet] on it,
      so it'll be for a next time.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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    2. I am also very surprised to know that you still have a milk delivery man coming on your street! Wow! I remenber them from my youth. Is the milk still delivered in those good glass bottles? (I guess not...) Well, I would encourage the milk man if I were still able to drink milk... ;¬)

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  2. Oh I do remember those glass bottles, as we used to get so many delivered daily to feed all those kids! I stopped drinking milk (and all dairy) in the late 80's for much the same reason as you...couldn't tolerate it. Did you know we humans are the only animal who drinks the milk from another species? I love Rice milk or almond milk. I have been told that we North Americans should watch our consumption of soy anything, unless one is Asian and has had generations of digesting this product.

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    1. The only species to drink another species' milk,
      and the only one to drink it beyond infancy...
      And we think we're SO clever!!
      Soy milk agrees with me,
      even if there is no Asian connection in my family tree.
      I must say I don't drink a whole lot.
      It's perhaps for the best.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  3. What a great post! The history of the company with pictures to match. I had forgotten about the milk man. How could I? My Dad worked as a milk salesman to the grocery stores for years. I had also completely forgotten about the "bag" milk. You post brought back tons of memories for me. Maybe someday I'll write them down.

    They are trying to frighten us now with the threat of milk going up to $8.00 per gallon. Great. I do like drinking milk.

    Kathy M.

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    1. $8/gallon?!?
      Why? Did they find gas in there?
      Though it does take some to proceed with distribution.
      The price of everything has gone up for that reason, transportation and fuel cost.
      Weird eh, the things that pop in our brains, triggered by the littlest of things.
      SS does that to us!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  4. When I was very young the local farmer delivered milk in churns; you went out to his van and he ladled milk out into your jugs. My elder brother filled up one of his churns with stones when he was visiting another house. Milk is still delivered in bottles to a few houses in the village. I never 'recovered' from having to drink milk at school. I'm glad that they rescued that huge bottle in Montreal. The horse and cart shots are priceless but we really needed a cow to complete the picture as some kids don't seem to know where it comes from in the first place. One of the companies that I worked for made heat exchangers for cooling milk rather like the one you have shown.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Alright, you get the palm here as I don't recall ever seeing churns.

      There was much protest when its removal was announced and people gathered to save it.
      And for a change, it worked out for the best!!

      I'm happy with this post because everyone seems to have a connection to this topic.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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    2. It's thrue, though... a cow is missing! ;¬D

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    3. Well, excuse me girl for focusing on the distributor rather than the producer!!
      But I won't begrudge you that comment as I know of your fascination with the bovine...
      You'll have to wait for another time to see a cow here.
      ;)~
      HUGZ

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  5. I remember the horse drawn milk wagon that I could see from my bedroom window when I was 3 or 4 and living in Springfield, Mass. And I remember the glass bottles and the milk trucks that put the milk bottles in the milk shoot where they would freeze in the winter. Now the milk shoots are cemented up in the old Detroit neighborhood to prevent break-ins. Thanks for the memories!

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    Replies
    1. Milk shoots?!?
      I'll have to look this up as I have no idea what these were.
      I remember the milkman leaving bottles on the front porch, period.
      I now have to google that!!!
      :D~
      HUGZ

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  6. Well the delivery men were sure dressed as gentlemen. Quite a difference I am sure from where the milk came from. Hooray for the bottle. Glad it survived. I remember the glass bottles.
    QMM

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    1. Even the milkmen of my youth were dressed a tad more casually than this.

      Much of those landmarks are now gone, so, if one got saved, it's because we lost a few others, sadly.
      But let's celebrate the good!!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  7. Super post!

    Je ne connaissais même pas l'existence de cette bouteille! J'aime bien quand une ville garde les souvenirs du passé présents, même si ils ne sont plus d'aucune actualité. ;¬)

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    1. Ouais, ils ont reussi a sauver celle-ci, mais combien d'autres places ont disparu?
      Tu ne l'avais JAMAIS vu?!? C'est a cote du Bell Center, a l'ouest.
      Toi qui te balade tellement en ville, j'en suis surpris.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  8. I just love the photos of the milkmen and horses! So nostalgic of a day gone by. I never experienced milkmen coming by our door though. And bravo! to the milk bottle being saved and restored!

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    1. Streets were busy back then, what with postmen, milkmen, and whatever else that could be delivered to your doorstep. I saw the end of it. Now, all I see is the UPS guy!!!

      Yeah, we have some fierce defenders of the city's heritage, fortunately!!
      It would have been a pity to lose this one. It just looks great up there,
      such a contrast with everything else around.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  9. Hi TB! I adore your photos of the milk bottle water tower! They are a spectacular tribute to something swallowed up by progress. You should put those in a gallery somewhere.

    I still drink milk, but also,soy, which both Kev and I like, especially chocolate! Sorry to hear you are lactose intolerant, my fudge has milk chocolate in it, so I guess I can't send you any. Boo.

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    1. Don't think you're off the hook just like that!!!
      I do have wine and cheese with friends and wine seems to somewhat minimize the "consequences"
      of eating dairy. It's raw milk that causes me the most troubles...
      I'll be expecting that package before year's end!!
      ;)~
      HUGZ

      (Those pics are on my Flickr and Tumblr accounts)

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  10. Loved the old photos! Interesting to watch this man's wagon get bigger and bigger as his business expanded! In my younger years I lived on a dairy farm, so I was part of the producer-end of things...but our milk got hauled away in an enormous stainless steel Oakhurst Dairy truck...we milked forty Jersey cows twice a day!

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    1. Sounds like a lot of work, 40 Jersey!!
      But beautiful beasts they are.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  11. I'm almost certain that the first two pictures show the same milkman, no? And like many others I also remember the bottled milk being brought to the front door. But it was also sold "loose". You just gave the milkman a pan. Have to admit I don't like bottled or packed milk. But straight from the cow (after she was milked:), yes! The difference is the percentage of cream it contains. And buttermilk...mmmm.

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    1. Well, that is how I remember it, but what you mentioned, my mother talked about that.
      I bet the taste must be quite different from the pasteurized one.
      :)~
      HUGZ

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  12. The giant milk bottle reminds me of the giant pineapple that used to stand in Honolulu near the Dole plant. I was so saddened when I found out it was gone. I loved it as a kid.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Why would they do something like that?
      Hardly makes any sense.
      Some people just have no sense of heritage.
      They didn't even preserve it elsewhere?!?
      :/~
      HUGZ

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  13. A great post about urban heritage. Taking down a vintage water tower like that is no different than cutting down a grand tree in a city park. The logo from Guaranteed Pure Milk sounds silly now, but I've read in several books on 19th century life that adulterated milk was once a major problem in cities around the world. It was watered down with chalk or worse added.

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    1. That's why pasteurisation was imposed on the industry. But this company had a good reputation.
      If you saw all of the major trees we had here that were taken down for a [stupid]reason or another,
      you'd cry!! And the smaller trees that replaced them have a hard time thriving.
      :(~
      HUGZ

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  14. Where I live, milk delivery is almost extinct. I'm not a milk drinker now (except in the form of hot chocolate), but as a teenager, I would drink a couple glasses of milk after school while watching "Dark Shadows."

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    1. When I was a kid, my mom used to call me her calf,
      'cause I drank a lot of it. But as I grew older,
      the thing just wouldn't go down anymore,
      causing me problems...
      :/~
      HUGZ

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  15. What a wonderful history of milk - my favourite the photos of the horses and carts.

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    1. Pretty hard to beat such classic photos of the past, isn't it!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

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