Saturday, March 9, 2013

SEPIA SATURDAY (152)

This week on Sepia Saturday
Alan's prompt picture would have us take a steam ship and go on a holiday. 
I've never been on a cruise, only a ferry but it was fun!! 
But aside from the usual waiving at the pier amidst shouts of 
"Bon Voyage!! Buon Viaggio!! Have a safe trip!!"
the next thing that comes to mind about your average tourist's behavior is: 
POSTCARDS!! 
It is always nice to receive one 
and my father had a stack of them in his things. 
If you were hoping to see a ship, 
you can always read that old post I wrote when Alan went on holidays 
and I poked some fun at him among other things, 
HERE


Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris, 
P.M.M. Edition.


Sacred Heart Basilica on Montmartre, Paris, 
edition unknown. 

You can see it is one card in a pack by the number on it. 
It is a small size and I've previously featured cards like these before. 
I no longer have the folder/envelope that contained these, 
hence the lack of info.


Sacred Heart Basilica on Montmartre, Paris, 
Yvon edition. 

One of my favorites 
and I presented some of his cards here before.


Sacred Heart Basilica on Montmartre, Paris, 
Yvon Edition.


L'Arc-de-Triomphe, Paris, 
Greff Edition. 

All of these postcards so far were unused, 
no writing on the back, 
no postmarks, 
nothing, 
because they were generally inserted in a letter. 
I got rid of my father's correspondence, 
but kept the cards...


Marseille, 
Tardy Edition. 

If the name of the company is Tardy, 
why did they print "Ary" on the front?!? 

All I can say is, 
these postcards date back to between after WW2 and the 1960s, 
before my father got married and actually had a social life...


Sarlat (Dordogne), France, 
S.A. APA-POUX-ALBI Edition. 

I received this one in 2006 while friends were traveling through the Perigord region, 
having the time of their life. 
You can see the history dripping from the old bones of the city. 
It looks well preserved, 
judging by this, of course!!


Cayo Coco (Cuba), 
The Postcard Factory Edition. 

I sent this to my parents in 1995 while away , 
relaxing my still young bones under a foreign sky 
while sipping a beer and chatting with folks [when I could understand them. 
My French proved of no use over there, 
but English came in handy 
and I scrambled to remember the little German I could. 
I only know a few words of Russian but enough to appear polite and proper. 
The only Spanish the locals taught me wouldn't get me far, 
but would cover the bare necessities of life: 
Hola!!, it's always nice to greet people [in their native tongue]; 
Si!!, always know how to say "yes", that's my motto; 
Bano, for obvious reasons...; 
Cervesa, as a Quebecois, I believe this is the first word we should learn 
and it is always nice to share a drink among friendly people. 

It is funny to see that this postcard I bought in Cuba was printed in Canada, 
so when I sent this to my parents, 
this card "came back home", 
so to speak. 
It really got a round trip!!

BTW
I left these cards full sized post scanning, 
so if you open them in a new tab instead of the lightbox, 
you can see them in a larger version, 
if the curiosity strikes you. 
:)~


Time to bring this home 
and send you off to your next destination, 
where other contributors will take you elsewhere... 
Buon Viaggio!!


Legit Sepians can always join our Facebook Group for fun and info!! 
:)~ 
HUGZ

33 comments:

  1. The Perigord postcard looks like you could walk down that street? Alley? and go back in time. I always wanted to visit Cuba but never got there. Glad you had fun drinking cervesa and sent a postcard back to it's place of origin.

    Can't believe I am the first to comment on your post this week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would presume that back in the medieval times,
      this was considered a street...
      Main street?!?
      :D~
      Cubans are a very warm people, well,
      those I met at least.

      I guess you have a head start.
      I haven't even begun yet.
      Big Photoshop project for me right now.
      You can see the butterflies in my other post.
      Flowers and plants later and in the next few days.
      Have a good week!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  2. You have such beautiful postcards. My favourite the atmospheric street in Dordogne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is inviting, isn't it!?!
      Makes you wonder what's just around the corner...
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  3. (Sorry about that, realized I was signed into the wrong Google account)

    Excellent postcards, though I feel no postcard of Notre Dame is complete without Quasimodo. I have only been to Paris once, when I was a mere lad of 14, and would like to return someday.

    The Cuban postcard carries through the SS theme of water nicely. I agree with your list of important words to know in any language.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As long as you know your "essentials",
      the rest will come along, eventually...
      :D~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  4. A fine collection of cards. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That's an interesting angle on L'Arc-de-Triomphe postcard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It gives a good view of the topography of that part of the city.
      Urban planning has its merits.
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  6. Wow these are great! How lucky that your dad had these! I thought the same thing about the L'Arc-de-Triomphe postcard!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, we've often seen it at ground level,
      so yeah, this is a nice change.
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  7. Very nice selection of postcards this week, thank you Bruno. Your first card has a similar feel to the old pre-Great War French postcards which were so commonly sent home by soldiers from the Western Front. I suspect "Ary" was the photographer's nom-de-plume.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your "suspicion" is the most plausible explanation.
      I would think that a pre-war postcard would still be possible
      but it would mean that someone handed this down to my father
      as I think he would have been too young(?)... for such things.
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
    2. No, I think you're right about it being from after the War - I wasn't suggesting otherwise, just that it has a similar feel to the older style.

      Delete
  8. I spent some time in Paris while in the army and don't have a postcard to show for it. I saw the Arc de Triomphe for the first time, at night, from the back of an army truck. The Perigord card is really atmospheric and stands out for me from the rest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My friends told me about their stay over there (Perigord),
      and they really loved that place, for the scenery,
      the people, the food, and the wine, of course!!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  9. Ah Cuba ! A Wonderful Place.I remember lots of Canadians There.A Brilliant Place.As,Of Course Is Paris! A Splendid Series Of Cards Bruno!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!!
      Given half a chance,
      any place can seem great to a foreigner...
      :)

      Delete
  10. Oh these are all wonderful and have me itching to travel.

    The last time I was in France I was sitting in a restaurant with traveling companions waiting for the hover craft to show up to take us to England. There was a couple sitting at a nearby table with a waiter talking to them. Because of their accents he thought they were American. When they said, "No, Canadian" the waiters whole attitude changed towards them. Suddenly he became very friendly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. French have a certain attachment to the New World...
      namely, Quebec!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  11. Another fine shoebox travelogue. We have a growing collection of unsent postcards to commemorate visits to foreign places. Something like a cathedral is impossible to photograph well and a postcard or guidebook will always have a better quality, but it's the image in my camera's viewfinder that I remember.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Because it reflects you're own personal experience,
      something unique.
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  12. I especially like both of the street scenes. The b&w could make a good prompt photo for SS.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "Marseille" postcard has always fascinated me,
      for some reason...
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  13. Most of my postcards are unused too. Sometimes I prefer to buy them simply because the photography is better than my own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awh, you see, I'm still hoping my skills will improve...
      I haven't given up yet!!
      :D~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  14. ME! Go on holiday! YOU! poke fun at me. NEVER.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right!!
      Thinking something like that would be so out of character...
      Sheer heresy!!
      ;)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  15. I love these old postcards, feel like I am walking through the streets of Old Paris. My favorite though is the Flamingo card, I have an entire board dedicated to flamingos on Pinterest! Love them!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A girl with a passion!!
      Interesting creatures, I'll grant you that much!!
      :)~
      HUGZ

      Delete
  16. I always enjoy shuffling through a stack of postcards and this time you've picked out the best ones for us to share. I too am much taken with the Dordogne card; it has a painterly quality. BTW 'cerveza' is one the first words you learn here too, coupled with 'grande'!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, Grande!!
      Now you're talking!!
      But honestly,
      is there anything else but "grande"?...
      Don't want to know!!
      Gotta live large!!
      :D~
      HUGZ

      Delete

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:)~

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